Don’t let unemployment shatter your home-buying dreams


Record-high unemployment since the Great Depression is worrying for people looking to buy a home. And it’s true that it’s very difficult to buy a home while unemployed, since lenders are are looking for stable income. Unemployment income is considered temporary income, which lenders aren’t going to look at. Even once you find a job again, lenders typically want two years of continuous employment. Gaps in employment older than two years don’t impact your chances of lending negatively, though, so that won’t be a concern in a long run.

Another problem is that lack of income could put a strain on your credit score. While you will eventually become employed again, changes to your credit score can be much harder to erase. In order to maximize your chances of getting a loan in the future, you should do as much as you can, starting now, to keep your credit score intact. Always make minimum payments if possible. Ask your landlord and credit companies about other payment plans, deferment, or forbearance. Cut back on unnecessary spending. The good news is that even if your credit score does take a dive, once you’ve settled the debts and start to rebuild your credit, it shouldn’t take too long to get your credit score back up — roughly six months to year, meaning you may have already recovered your credit before lenders will consider your employment to be stable.

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More: https://www.realtor.com/advice/finance/how-unemployment-can-affect-your-plans-to-buy-a-home/

Coronavirus exposes the wealth gap


For some people, the impact of coronavirus was minimal and short-lived. These are the people who had job security and a place to work from home, enabling them to continue to earn money while many people were left unemployed or temporarily out of work. Many low-income workers, a group with a large percentage of minorities, were already priced out of owning a home before COVID-19. The economic shutdown exacerbated this issue, while those able to live in relative comfort are looking to enjoy low interest rates by purchasing additional homes, beyond what they already own. This has meant that the housing market has started to rebound relatively quickly, especially in tech centers such as San Francisco, since those with money who are most able to engage in the process were only minorly inconvenienced at the same time that lower-income people fall further behind.

Photo by Sean Pollock on Unsplash

More: https://www.forbes.com/sites/brendarichardson/2020/06/22/coronavirus-housing-rebound-exposes-the-wealth-divide/

Eviction laws under the Tenant Protection Act

The Tenant Protection Act of 2019 (TPA), enacted last fall, establishes regulations for just cause evictions. The laws primarily apply to apartment units, but may affect other types of residences in certain scenarios. Just cause is required if all tenants have lawfully occupied the residence for 12 consecutive months, or if at least one tenant has lawfully occupied it for 24 consecutive months. In addition, the landlord may be required to provide relocation assistance for no-fault just cause evictions.

The TPA provides several forms used for various types of just cause evictions. The primary distinction is between at-fault and no-fault evictions. The possible reasons for a no-fault eviction are intention to occupy, withdrawal from the rental market, demolition or renovation, or if a government agency determines the property to be unfit for habitation through no fault of the tenant. At-fault evictions are much more complex, and may require either a Three-Day Notice to Perform or a Three-Day Notice to Quit. The latter is also the next step should the tenant not respond appropriately to the former. At-fault just cause may include a breach of lease terms, a default on payment, or criminal activity, among other possibilities.

You can find more information about the TPA at https://journal.firsttuesday.us/2020s-tenant-protection-act-part-i-just-cause-eviction/72036/, or you can call or email us for more information or assistance regarding tenancy or evictions.

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Forbearances down overall, but not for private loans


Data has been showing that forbearances on mortgage loans have been trending downwards in June from the peak on May 22, albeit at a slow rate. However, this doesn’t tell the whole story. The downward trend totalling 158,000 is almost entirely from loans backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac or FHA/VA loans. Loans backed by banks or private securities are actually up 6000.

This trend points to trouble particularly for self-employed borrowers. Even with some people returning to work or working from home as lockdowns are phased out, in an uncertain economy, self-employed people don’t have the same reliability of income. Most private loans are held by self-employed workers. Without a stable income, self-employed people aren’t certain whether or not they’ll be able to pay back their mortgages until the economy re-situates itself, so more of them are requesting forbearances.

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More: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/19/coronavirus-mortgage-bailout-shrinks-further-but-bank-held-loans-are-faring-worse.html

June COVID-19 Impact Update


Two months after reopening, the California economy is recovering unevenly, but recovering nonetheless. The housing market is a strong leader in the recovery process, with low interest rates contributing to a surge in activity after the last two months’ lull. The recovery will take time, though. The UCLA Anderson Forecast predicts a GDP decline of 42% in this quarter before easing back up 11% and then 7.6% in the next two quarters of this year. The total change from last year is expected to be a decline of 8.6%.

May was probably the trough for home sales, and they will pick up in the coming months. The extension of the foreclosure and eviction moratorium coupled with all-time low interest rates should allow buyers to regain their bearings quickly, and thus demand hasn’t suffered. Low supply and and a smaller than expected decrease in unemployment claims could point to a slower pace, but shouldn’t prevent recovery.

Call or email us if you want more information or are ready to buy or sell. Also, if you live in the South Bay or are interested in data about the area, stay tuned for a special South Bay update in early July.

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More: https://www.car.org/knowledge/pubs/newsletters/newsline/covid62420

Scams are an increasing threat to online real estate


Don Sabatini, a real estate agent in Willow Glen, CA, relates his true story of his client becoming the victim of a digital real estate scam. The COVID-19 outbreak meant that Sabatini had to conduct much of his business via email, though he and his client agreed to present the cashier’s check in person, while following social distancing guidelines. Despite this agreement, a scammer had been looking in on the email exchange. The client received several emails posing as the title agent, lender, and even Sabatini himself, increasingly threatening in tone. The scammer told the client that the offices will likely be closed, so she should simply wire the money. Feeling pressured by the barrage of threatening emails, she did so. The client and Sabatini realized she’d been scammed the next afternoon, but by then some of the money was irreparably lost. Fortunately, she was able to recover most of it, losing only $2000, and complete the transaction.

This story isn’t an isolated incident. The most recent data is from 2018, with the FBI estimating 11,300 people became victims of an online real estate scam in that year alone. It was an increase of 17% from 2017. Even without data from this year, you can imagine that with current pandemic increasing the rate of online real estate transactions, the rate of scam attempts is also increasing.

We are still conducting business, so don’t hesitate to call or email us if you are looking to buy or sell, but do be careful of scams.

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More: https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/06/15/new-pandemic-concern-digital-real-estate-scams/

Investors are Still Eyeing Real Estate

According to a Gallup poll of favorite investment options, real estate remains at the top where it’s been since 2013, currently at 35%. It has been over 33% since 2016. After dropping by 6% since last year, the popularity of stocks and mutual funds is down to 21%, its lowest since 2012. While the percentage favoring savings accounts and CDs, gold, or bonds has increased slightly, their numbers remain low at 17%, 16%, and 8% respectively.

Even stockowners are now less likely to favor stocks as the best investment, but that doesn’t mean stocks are going away. Stock ownership is still stable at 55%, and hasn’t veered too much from that number since it started falling off during the Great Recession. It may not be the best option, but the number that think stock investment is a good option remains nearly identical to the number that think it’s a bad option.

If you’re interested in investing in real estate, we can help! Call or email us about buying or selling investment property.

Photo by Chris Liverani on Unsplash

More: https://news.gallup.com/poll/309233/stock-investments-lose-luster-covid-sell-off.aspx

Foreclosure and eviction moratorium extended

As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which regulates Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (the Enterprises), had instituted a moratorium on foreclosures and evictions for Enterprise-backed single-family mortgages. The moratorium was scheduled to end on June 30th, but on June 17th, the FHFA announced that the date will be extended to August 31st. The FHFA plans to continue to monitor the situation and make further adjustments as needed.

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More: https://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Extends-Foreclosure-and-Eviction-Moratorium-6172020.aspx

May 2020 report demonstrates slowdown


The California Association of Realtors (CAR) released their May sales and price report on June 16th, and the numbers are showing a definite slowdown. Existing single family home sales totalled 238,740 in May, down 13.9% from April and down 41.4% from last May. The median home price was $588,070, a drop of 3% from April and 3.7% from last year. May also saw a year-to-date statewide home sale decrease of 12.9%. The Bay Area seems to have been hit the hardest. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic was California home sales falling to the lowest level since the Great Depression.

The good news is that May was probably the worst of it. The market shows signs of recovering, especially buyer demand shooting up from record lows. One county, Del Norte, even reported a year-over-year increase in sales, and 31 reported a year-over-year increase in prices. Interest rates are also down from last year.

Interested in data for your area? You can find the full table of statistics at https://www.car.org/aboutus/mediacenter/newsreleases/2020releases/may2020sales, and you can also call or email us for more information.

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